Committee for the Abolition of Third World Debt – Newsletter Number 69 – Monday 17 September 2012

Committee for the Abolition of Third World Debtwww.cadtm.org
Newsletter Number 69 – Monday 17 September 2012

English version sent to 2373 suscribers – French version sent to 24551 suscribers – Spanish version sent to 7760 suscribers

CADTM English Newsletter Email: info@cadtm.org
Subscription/Unsubscription: http://cadtm.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/cadtm-newsletter-en
The CADTM also publishes a newsletter in French http://www.cadtm.org/Bulletin-electronique and in Spanish http://www.cadtm.org/Boletin-Electronico.

 

SUMMARY

Debt and austerity in European countries

» Spain: Let’s encircle the Congress. We are the sovereign people!
by Plataforma “¡En Pie!”
We, ordinary people are fed up to live with the consequences of a system conditioned by and forced to adapt itself to the markets, which is in every respect insupportable, and has led us to be victims of a large scale scam which has caused this crisis. We unify in order to edit this manifesto. (…) [Read more]


United Stated

» Occupy 2.0: Strike Debt
by Astra Taylor
When Occupy Wall Street sprang up a year ago, one of its most aptivating features was that it was one big tent, an overarching idea linking together a long-fragmented left. Today, bereft of the encampments—all the little tents—there’s no denying that Occupy isn’t as powerful a connector as it once (…) [Read more]
» Can Debt Spark a Revolution?
by David Graeber
The idea of the “99 percent” managed to do something that no one has done in the United States since the Great Depression: revive the concept of social class as a political issue. What made this possible was a subtle change in the very nature of class power in this country, which, I have come to (…) [Read more]

Debt Cancellation throughout history

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» The Long Tradition of Debt Cancellation in Mesopotamia and Egypt from 3000 to 1000 BC
by Eric Toussaint
Hammurabi, king of Babylon, and debt cancellation The Hammurabi Code is in the Louvre Museum, in Paris. The term “code” is inappropriate, because what Hammurabi left us is a set of rules and judgements on relations between public authorities and citizens. Hammurabi began his 42-year reign (…) [Read more] 

Egypt

» Egypt. ’No’ to borrowing on the terms of the IMF, Ganzouri and their successors
by Wael Gamal
In a statement to Al-Shorouk newspaper ten days ago, Egypt’s Minister of Finance Momtaz El-Said said that Prime Minister Kandil’s cabinet will restart negotiations with the International Monetary Fund for loans “based on the economic programme that [his predecessor] Ganzouri’s government submitted (…) [Read more]

Latin America

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» Intellectuals and world personalities make public their support to the sovereign decision of asylum to Julian Assange
To the above mentioned joined the support of organizations of the civil society and regional and hemispheric integration organisms to the decision of Ecuador of granting diplomatic asylum to Julian Assange and to reject the threat of the United Kingdom of intervening in the Ecuadorian Embassy (…) [Read more] 

Asia

» ‘New Loans for Old’: Sri Lanka’s Spiralling External Debt
by B. Skanthakumar Sri Lanka’s foreign debt doubled between 2000 and 2012 and is now more than USD18 billion or LKR2375 billion (US$1=Rs132). In comparison, Sri Lanka’s total economic output (gross domestic product) in 2011 was under USD60 billion. As the amount of Sri Lanka’s borrowings from abroad increases, so (…) [Read more]

ACT NOW: Support Debt Justice for Zimbabwe

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» ACT NOW: Support Debt Justice for Zimbabwe
by Jubilee Debt Campaign
With fresh elections due next year, debt campaigners in Zimbabwe want lessons learned about the country’s $7 billion debt. Take action now to support their call. Zimbabwe stopped paying most of its debts in the year 2000. Since then, Zimbabweans have faced economic chaos and social upheaval. But today there is new hope. [Read more] 

BOOK

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» IFIs and debt politics. Pleading Pakistan’s case
by Abdul Khaliq
Syed Abdul Khaliq is a debt campaigner and coordinator of CADTM Pakistan. This book by him contributes mighty arguments for the cancellation of Pakistan’s public debt. I am convinced that this work is an excellent tool for all Pakistani citizens who want to do away with a system that subjects them to the burden of the debt. It will also be much appreciated by many readers outside Pakistan who want to understand what is actually at stake in that country and how this kind of analysis can be applied to their country. Dr.Eric Toussaint, President CADTM [Read more]
For more information about this book, please contact CADTM Pakistan

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» Glance in the Rear View Mirror. Neoliberal Ideology From its Origins to the Present
by Éric Toussaint
As the financial crisis continues to shake the global economy it has begun to expose cracks in the ideological edifice long used to justify neo-liberal policies of privatization and austerity. This informed and accessible primer drives a wedge into these cracks, allowing the non-experts among the 99% to understand the flaws in the economic philosophy of the 1%. (…) [Read more]
ISBN: 978-1-60846-254-4
Price: $4.95
BUY THIS BOOK DIRECTLY FROM THE HAYMARKET BOOKS STORE

The CADTM Archive

To read previous articles and analysis published on the CADTM Website, please consult our Archive by thematic issues or by country.

One thought on “Committee for the Abolition of Third World Debt – Newsletter Number 69 – Monday 17 September 2012

  1. Pingback: Committee for the Abolition of Third World Debt – Newsletter Number 69 – Monday 17 September 2012 | ANOTHER WORLD IS NOW! - GLOBAL SPRING | Scoop.it

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